Should I buy a Hisense TV? A look at the budget 4K television brand

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Should you buy a Hisense TV? With so many TV brands out there, offering everything from budget small TVs to wall-filling displays, it can feel impossible to really suss out which one is going to be right for your purchase – and that's why we're here to help.

Hisense is a brand you'll likely have come across if you're looking for a TV at a good price. As a budget TV brand specifically, Hisense will generally offer premium technologies for lower than the competition, meaning if you're mainly fussed about a particular HDR format or 4K resolution at the cheapest possible price, Hisense will probably have a set to suit you.

As a large Chinese manufacturer of various electrical goods, Hisense covers everything from fridges to washing machines, though its smart TV range is one of the biggest parts of its burgeoning business. And despite being state-owned – like many Chinese companies – Hisense has plenty of international connections.

Back in 2015 it licensed the famous Sharp brand, bought part of a Mexican TV production line and started making televisions for the US and South American markets using the Japanese company’s name – and then went several steps further by buying Toshiba's TV business.

So you should be in no doubt that Hisense is a major player with a solid presence in the competitive television market.

Should I buy a Hisense TV?

So, after a brief history lesson, are Hisense television deals worth considering? As ever, the answer depends on a number of factors.

Fundamentally the panels used in these sets are decent. They tend to offer nice sharp images, decent black levels, and good color balance.

However, with the sets that support HDR, don't expect them to offer the same peak brightness as more expensive sets from bigger name brands. This means that the images shown on the sets don't quite have the same sparkle to them as better HDR sets.

Their smart TV OS can also be a little hit and miss across its different models. We liked it when we reviewed the 55N6800 where we were impressed by the range of apps on offer, even if the overall interface wasn't as sophisticated as other sets.

However, it was a different story when we reviewed the 32M2600 which featured an interface that was sluggish and slow. The app selection was also much less broad.

Thankfully, these OS issues can be sidestepped entirely – if you have them – by using a streaming box or streaming stick such as the Chromecast Ultra, Roku Streaming Stick+ or Nvidia Shield TV.

The Hisense TV price range is where its got a real edge, with the Chinese company firmly focusing its sights on the middle-market – with occasional forays into more high-end hardware like the massive (and massively bright) H75U9A.

Hisense's flagship televisions – although good – are not quite at the level of the best TVs in the world, but that they often come in significantly cheaper than their peers.

Lower down the range you are also going to see significant savings. The upshot is that although your television may not be the talk of the neighbours, it's not likely to disappoint, and the money you save can definitely be spent on getting great 4K content.

There's a clear tension between quality and affordability, though. While the H55OB8UK is the cheapest OLED TV on the market, it doesn't have the processing smarts to maintain consistent image quality in the same way as its pricier OLED competitors.

Hisense TV reviews

Perhaps most crucially, what did TechRadar make of Hisense's latest TV sets?

We've reviewed Hisense televisions of all sizes and price ranges, from the 32-inch M2600 to the 65-inch Series 7 ULED. Check out some of the review links below.

  • For our top TV picks, our guide to the best TVs is here to help

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