election Archive

  • The Conservative Party has denied claims it broke electoral law by using a Neath call centre to canvass voters during the general election campaign.An investigation by Channel 4 claimed the UK Tories contracted Blue Telecoms to conduct marketing campaigns ahead of the vote on 5 June.The Information Commissioners Officer confirmed it would be asking the Tories about the calls.A Conservative spokesman said all the calls were complaint with the law.Blue Telecoms has been contacted for a comment. An undercover investigation by C4 News, broadcast on Thursday, claimed the workers may have been carrying out paid canvassing, banned under electoral law, as they promoted key Conservative messages to undecided voters in the weeks before the election.The investigation claimed that calls were made to voters in key marginal seats, including Bridgend, Gower, Clwyd South and Wrexham.At the start of the election campaign, the information commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, contacted all parties to r..

    Tories deny using Neath call centre to breach election law

    The Conservative Party has denied claims it broke electoral law by using a Neath call centre to canvass voters during the general election campaign.An investigation by Channel 4 claimed the UK Tories contracted Blue Telecoms to conduct marketing campaigns ahead of the vote on 5 June.The Information Commissioners Officer confirmed it would be asking the Tories about the calls.A Conservative spokesman said all the calls were complaint with the law.Blue Telecoms has been contacted for a comment. An undercover investigation by C4 News, broadcast on Thursday, claimed the workers may have been carrying out paid canvassing, banned under electoral law, as they promoted key Conservative messages to undecided voters in the weeks before the election.The investigation claimed that calls were made to voters in key marginal seats, including Bridgend, Gower, Clwyd South and Wrexham.At the start of the election campaign, the information commissioner, Elizabeth Denham, contacted all parties to r..
    Read More
  • Original Article
  • Later this year the Supreme Court will hear a new spin on a scourge almost as old as the republic: partisan gerrymandering, a trick whereby politicians pick their voters rather than the other way around. In recent years, the justices have cracked down on districts that are drawn using predominantly racial lines. A ruling in 2015 held that Alabama violated th..

    A new Supreme Court case could rejigger electoral lines for the 2020 election

    Later this year the Supreme Court will hear a new spin on a scourge almost as old as the republic: partisan gerrymandering, a trick whereby politicians pick their voters rather than the other way around. In recent years, the justices have cracked down on districts that are drawn using predominantly racial lines. A ruling in 2015 held that Alabama violated th..
    Read More
  • Original Article
  • Image caption The broadcast featuring the farmer aired on BBC One Scotland on 12 October 2016 A Scottish National Party political broadcast unfairly featured footage of an East Lothian farmer, regulator Ofcom has ruled.The item, aired on BBC One Scotland on 12 October 2016, featured John Shedden sitting on a straw bale.Although aware of the recording, Mr Shedden said he was told it was for a Scottish government information film.Ofcom recognised that he was not a supporter of the SNP and he had not given his "informed consent".The watchdog upheld the complaint from Mr Shedden saying: "We considered that the inclusion of the footage of Mr Shedden in a party political broadcast, for a party which he did not support, without his informed consent, resulted in material facts [ie his political views] being presented in the broadcast in a manner that resulted in unfairness to him." No written consentThe BBC said that the content of such films was primarily the responsibility of the partie..

    SNP election broadcast ‘unfair’ to farmer, regulator Ofcom rules

    Image caption The broadcast featuring the farmer aired on BBC One Scotland on 12 October 2016 A Scottish National Party political broadcast unfairly featured footage of an East Lothian farmer, regulator Ofcom has ruled.The item, aired on BBC One Scotland on 12 October 2016, featured John Shedden sitting on a straw bale.Although aware of the recording, Mr Shedden said he was told it was for a Scottish government information film.Ofcom recognised that he was not a supporter of the SNP and he had not given his "informed consent".The watchdog upheld the complaint from Mr Shedden saying: "We considered that the inclusion of the footage of Mr Shedden in a party political broadcast, for a party which he did not support, without his informed consent, resulted in material facts [ie his political views] being presented in the broadcast in a manner that resulted in unfairness to him." No written consentThe BBC said that the content of such films was primarily the responsibility of the partie..
    Read More
  • Original Article
  • Chancellor Philip Hammond has criticised the way the Conservatives fought the general election campaign, saying there should have been more focus on the economy.Mr Hammond said he was unhappy at the low-key role he was given and said the Tories should have put more effort into "dismantling" Labour's plans.He also said the government "heard a message" in the election that people were "weary" of spending cuts."We are not deaf", he told Andrew Marr.

    Philip Hammond attacks Tory general election campaign

    Chancellor Philip Hammond has criticised the way the Conservatives fought the general election campaign, saying there should have been more focus on the economy.Mr Hammond said he was unhappy at the low-key role he was given and said the Tories should have put more effort into "dismantling" Labour's plans.He also said the government "heard a message" in the election that people were "weary" of spending cuts."We are not deaf", he told Andrew Marr.
    Read More
  • Original Article
  • Image caption The Conservatives are having to rely on the support of 10 DUP MPs after they fell eight seats short of winning an overall majority Northern Ireland's main parties are expected to hold talks with the prime minister in Downing Street on Thursday.Sinn Féin, the UUP, Alliance and the SDLP will hold separate meetings with Theresa May in the afternoon.She has already held talks with the DUP this week about a deal to support her minority Conservative government.DUP sources have told the BBC an announcement on a deal with Tories had been delayed because of the unfolding tragedy of the Grenfell Tower blaze.Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has demanded details of any Conservative-DUP deal, calling it a "nonsense situation". "We want to know what is in the deal they are offering to the DUP and we want to know when it is going to be put before Parliament," he said. Election Live - rolling text and video updates Quick guide to what's going on Who are the DUP&#039..

    General election: Northern Ireland parties to meet May

    Image caption The Conservatives are having to rely on the support of 10 DUP MPs after they fell eight seats short of winning an overall majority Northern Ireland's main parties are expected to hold talks with the prime minister in Downing Street on Thursday.Sinn Féin, the UUP, Alliance and the SDLP will hold separate meetings with Theresa May in the afternoon.She has already held talks with the DUP this week about a deal to support her minority Conservative government.DUP sources have told the BBC an announcement on a deal with Tories had been delayed because of the unfolding tragedy of the Grenfell Tower blaze.Meanwhile, Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn has demanded details of any Conservative-DUP deal, calling it a "nonsense situation". "We want to know what is in the deal they are offering to the DUP and we want to know when it is going to be put before Parliament," he said. Election Live - rolling text and video updates Quick guide to what's going on Who are the DUP&#039..
    Read More
  • The Conservatives have lost seats in Parliament and no longer enjoy an overall majority, while Labour has exceeded the expectations of pollsters and increased its number of MPs. But this isn't the whole story...1. The Conservatives won 20 seatsAlthough it was a bad night for Theresa May's party overall, with 33 MPs ejected from Parliament, it actually won seats elsewhere.The majority of their gains were in Scotland, where the Conservatives performed well against the SNP, unseating the former SNP leader Alex Salmond in Gordon.The party also took six seats from Labour, and snatched Clacton from UKIP.2. Who lost seats to Labour?Labour's six losses were offset by 36 gains - 28 of which were from the Conservatives and two from the Lib Dems - including Nick Clegg's former seat of Sheffield Hallam. The party also took six Scottish seats from the SNP. 3. Most of the changes were in Scotland and the north of EnglandAlthough the political landscape of Northern Ireland ..

    Which seats changed hands at election?

    The Conservatives have lost seats in Parliament and no longer enjoy an overall majority, while Labour has exceeded the expectations of pollsters and increased its number of MPs. But this isn't the whole story...1. The Conservatives won 20 seatsAlthough it was a bad night for Theresa May's party overall, with 33 MPs ejected from Parliament, it actually won seats elsewhere.The majority of their gains were in Scotland, where the Conservatives performed well against the SNP, unseating the former SNP leader Alex Salmond in Gordon.The party also took six seats from Labour, and snatched Clacton from UKIP.2. Who lost seats to Labour?Labour's six losses were offset by 36 gains - 28 of which were from the Conservatives and two from the Lib Dems - including Nick Clegg's former seat of Sheffield Hallam. The party also took six Scottish seats from the SNP. 3. Most of the changes were in Scotland and the north of EnglandAlthough the political landscape of Northern Ireland ..
    Read More